Georg Joseph Vogler (1749−1814)

Georg Joseph Vogler was born in Würzburg on 15 June 1749 and died on 6 May 1814 in Darmstadt. He was a composer, music theorist, educator, piano and organ virtuoso, a designer of musical instruments and a Roman Catholic priest. In 1786 King Gustav III summoned him to Stockholm for employment as court conductor and tutor to the Crown Prince. He worked in Sweden until 1799, composing among other works, the opera Gustaf Adolph and Ebba Brahe and the Advent song Hosianna, Davids son. Elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Music in 1786.

Early years

Georg Joseph Vogler was born on 15 June 1749 in Würzburg as the youngest son of court musician and instrument-maker Johann Georg Vogler (1692−1752). Georg Joseph showed early signs of musical talent and began to compose music during his study years, something he continued doing while studying law and theology at the universities in Würzburg and Bamberg.

In 1771, Vogler travelled to Mannheim, where he managed to win the favour of Prince-Elector Charles Theodore. Within the year he finished composing the opera Der Kaufmann von Smyrna, which was performed successfully at the royal court; the following year he was appointed court chaplain.

With the Prince as patron, Vogler was able to spend the years 1773−75 furthering his musical education. Dissatisfied with his studies with Padre Martini in Bologna, he moved on to study with Johann Adolph Hasse in Venice, followed by a longer period with Francesco Antonio Valotti in Padua, where he also developed his studies in theology. From Padua he steered towards Rome, where he seems to have been very successful; one of his accomplishments was to be appointed as both Papal prothonotary and Knight of the Golden Spur. During this time spent in Italy, he was also ordained as a priest.

Returning to Mannheim, Vogler was appointed spiritual advisor and vice Hofkapellmeister. However, his main focus was on the music school, Mannheimer Tonschule, which he founded in the autumn of 1776 with the Prince’s support. It was at this school that Vogler began his writings on music theory. Due to his responsibilities at the school, he remained in Mannheim when the royal court moved to Munich in 1778. He did not join the court again until he was appointed first Hofkapellmeister in 1784. However, Vogler did not tarry in Mannheim during the intervening years. Instead, he spent most of his time in Paris, and also travelled to London. In Paris, he devoted himself to various opera projects in addition to fervent work as a concert performer, not least as an organ virtuoso.

Vogler’s international concert career did not end with his relocation to Munich in 1784, although by all means he was required to spend more time attending to the court orchestra. For instance, Vogler’s opera Castore e Polluce was performed here. His time in Munich, however, came to be short. In 1785 a request arrived from the Swedish court: Gustav III expressed a wish for Vogler to be his court conductor and tutor to the Crown Prince.

Activities in Sweden

Vogler arrived in Stockholm in June 1786 and was hired on 22 September as ‘director of the music’ at the Kungliga Operan (the Royal Opera) on very good terms: 2000 riksdaler annually for ten years and a lifetime pension thereafter of 1000 riksdaler annually. In addition, he would while employed have the right to six months’ leave per year − something Vogler took advantage of extensively for several lengthy European concert tours. However, after renegotiations the following year, his contract was shortened to five years, and his pension was cut in half. One of the tasks included in his contract was to compose one opera per year. However, after five years, the only opera Vogler had completed was Gustaf Adolph och Ebba Brahe, with libretto by poet and royal librarian Johan Henric Kellgren after an original script by Gustav III. The first performance was on 24 January 1788; the opera would be performed a total of 23 times over the next six years. This magnificent Gustavian opera is particularly characterised by its blend of styles, its highly varied, nuanced orchestration and musical design. The plot revolves around the relationship between the king and the people, which is reflected in a musical exchange between elevated tragic and folk elements, not least in the opera’s second act where Vogler makes use of the traditional tune ‘Hönsgummans visa’ in one of the scenes.

Another of Vogler’s duties included composing works for special occasions; there are records of a Svenskt festspel till förhärligande af Konung Gustaf III (Festival Overture for the Glorification of King Gustav III) from 1786. That same year Vogler also composed a divertissement for the King’s inauguration of Stora Haga Palace with text by poet and Marshal of the Realm Johan Gabriel Oxenstierna.

Composing music was not Vogler’s main occupation in Sweden; rather, his primary focus was on teaching and giving concerts. Shortly after his arrival in Sweden he gave his first organ concert at Uppsala Cathedral in June 1786. In the advertisements for his Swedish farewell solo organ concerts in November 1798, he assigned his works the numbers 99 and 100. 36 of his earlier concerts took place in Stockholm, so Vogler was evidently a busy concert performer around the country.

Predominantly featured on the programme for these organ concerts were dramatic tone paintings depicting more or less detailed scenes. Examples of stories Vogler depicted musically include Hufvudscenerne af Sauls och Davids Historia, enligt Bibelen (Scenes from the Story of Saul and David, according to the Bible); Caracteristiske drag af Konung Gustaf Wasas lefnad (Highlights from the Life of King Gustav Wasa) and Yttersta domen (The Last Judgement). Vogler depicted such acts by creating moods combined with dramatic effects; for example, he imitated the tumbling of the walls in the tone painting Jerichos belägring (the Battle of Jericho) by simultaneously pushing down on as many keys as possible on the organ. This sort of music making, however, was not without its critics; on more than one occasion the press wrote negative comments concerning Vogler’s organ concerts. But at the same time, he also had his defenders, including among others the poet Bengt Lidner who also wrote the text to Vogler’s cantata Helig är Herran (Holy is the Lord), which was one of the first works Vogler composed in Sweden. It was performed for the first time in July 1786. This exalted work reappeared later on a number of Vogler’s concert programmes during the 1790’s.

Vogler’s Swedish concerts were not solely confined to organ concerts, including in addition several so-called concerts spirituels where works by Haydn and Mozart were performed, as well as compositions by older composers such as Handel and Palestrina.

Of great importance to the Swedish music scene was Vogler’s opening of a ‘National School of Music’ in Stockholm in the autumn of 1786. It was instantly of major influence, especially as activities at the educational institution of the Kungliga Musikaliska akademien (the Royal Swedish Academy of Music) were in abeyance for economic reasons. It was admittedly not in existence for long, as it seems to have been shut down already in 1787, but not until it forced the Academy to increase its efforts and resume teaching activities.

To Africa − and back to Sweden

Vogler’s contract with the Opera expired on 1 July 1791, and he began to plan an extended research trip to Spain and North Africa in order to seek the origins of Western music. The following summer he traveled through Portugal and Greece to Africa where he transcribed several songs and ballads. He later performed several of these at concerts with programme titles such as Africansk Musik (African Music) and Mohrernas Liksång i Marocko (Funeral Songs of the Moors in Morocco).

On 1 July 1793, Vogler was reengaged by the Swedish court for another four years with the annual salary of 1700 riksdaler (and the same pension as before). This agreement was extended until 1799. During this period Vogler remained in Sweden to a greater extent. He continued performing frequently, giving both organ concerts and concerts spirituels. The latter were often organised to assist the Fund for the Benefit of the Widows and Orphans of the Royal Court Orchestra, established on 7 April 1794 at Vogler’s initiative.

Neither at this point in time was writing music Vogler’s main interest. He composed a few incidental works in 1795: a prologue for the coronation of King Gustav IV, and music for the Seraphim Order’s Day, with text by poet, theatre director and government official Abraham Niclas Edelcrantz. Excerpts from the latter can also be found in a couple of Vogler’s concert programmes.

Vogler also composed a certain amount of liturgical music during this period, including his best-known and most frequently performed composition, the Advent hymn ‘Hosianna, Davids son’.

Two additional works from Vogler final years in Sweden should be mentioned: his somewhat original C major symphony ‘la scala’ and the music to general and statesman Anders Fredrik Skjöldebrand’s play Hermann von Unna. The latter was a great success and was staged at several locations in Europe. In Vogler’s evocative music one finds clear characteristics of early romanticism, not least in regards to his innovative use of wind instruments.

During his second period in Stockholm, Vogler began to give lectures in music theory and analysis. In conjunction with this, in 1794 he published the textbook Inledning til harmoniens kännedom (Introduction to Harmony). A few years later he also published Clavér-schola (Piano School) (1798) and Organist-schola (Organist School) (1798−99). As the second part of the Organist-schola Vogler also published a Choral-Bok consisting of 90 chorale melodies with four-part accompaniment, which later gave rise to a brief but fierce debate with the composer J.C.F. Haeffner.

Another activity Vogler began to pursue at this time, and that was to continue to be of interest to him for the rest of his life, was organ design. He developed a ‘simplification system’, based on the idea that low notes could be produced artificially by combining tones. By using this method conscientiously, the number of organ pipes could be reduced considerably. Vogler had first used this in his ‘orchestrion’, the portable organ he built in the late 1780’s, which he often performed on at his own concerts. He now began to propagate his system for larger church organs and became involved in various renovation and remodelling projects around Europe. One of the first was at Hedvig’s Church in Norrköping in cooperation with organ builder Pehr Schiörlin.

Later years

After leaving Sweden in the spring of 1799, Vogler spent one year in Copenhagen, followed by a period in Berlin and then Prague. This time he was mainly devoted to different organ projects, acoustic experiments, lectures, and the publishing of theoretical writings. Vogler then spent several years in Vienna, where in 1804 he composed the opera Samori for Schikaneder’s Theater an der Wien. Here he also met Haydn, competed against Beethoven in improvisation, and began as teacher of Carl Maria von Weber.

In the summer of 1805, Vogler returned to Munich, but although he soon won the court’s admiration, he failed to secure a position. His financial situation was aggravated by his Swedish pension being withdrawn in 1806. So instead he moved to Darmstadt, where Louis I, Grand Duke of Hesse, had offered him a position as Hofkapellmeister and spiritual advisor. Weber joined him in Darmstadt in order to resume his composition studies. Vogler also taught, among others, the composers Giacomo Meyerbeer and Johann Gansbacher, as well as music theorist Gottfried Weber.

Despite his position in Darmstadt, Vogler did not abandon his various organ building projects, which unfortunately came to ruin him. In arrears, he died from a stroke in Darmstadt on 6 May 1814.

Significance and work

Vogler was a very prolific composer who wrote over 300 works during his lifetime; unfortunately, the quality of his compositions is not as impressive as his productivity. Too often, his works suffer from strikingly conventional melodies. But at the same time, many of his works exhibit an inventive use of instrumentation, including a frequent and prominent use of wind instruments. In addition, his use of folk music elements, as in the opera Gustaf Adolph and Ebba Brahe, can be considered innovative. The same is true also of works from his later years, including his introduction of different national musical styles and expressions that can be found for example in the collection Polymelos.


Vogler had greater impact as a performer than as a composer; his concerts around Europe were very popular and well attended. This endeavour was naturally of considerable significance for the provincial music country of Sweden, particularly because Vogler did not confine himself to the capital. Probably of greater importance for posterity were his achievements in music education. His role as an influential teacher of both Carl Maria von Weber and Giacomo Meyerbeer is often emphasised, but his comprehensive teaching in Mannheim (where he also was Joseph Martin Kraus’ teacher) and Stockholm deserve equal importance. Even the publication of his theoretical music writings was significant, not least for the Swedish music scene at the time. However, Vogler’s music theory ideas have had limited impact on posterity. The same can be said about his thoughts regarding organ design and his ‘simplification system’.

Mårten Nehrfors © 2015
Trans. Thalia Thunander

Publications by the composer

Tonwissenschaft und Tonsetzkunst, Mannheim, 1776.
Stimmbildungskunst,
Mannheim, 1776.
Kuhrpfälzische Tonschule,
Mannheim, 1778.
Gründe der Kuhrpfälzischen Tonschule in Beyspielen,
Mannheim, 1778.
Betrachtungen der Mannheimer Tonschule,
4 delar, Mannheim, 1778–81.
Articles in Deutsche Encyclopädie, oder Allgemeines Real-Wörterbuch aller Künste und Wissenschaften, part 2−18, Frankfurt, 1779−94.
Entwurf eines neuen Wörterbuchs für die Tonschule,
Frankfurt, 1780.
'Ueber die Musik der Oper Rosamunde', in: Rheinische Beiträge zur Gelehrsamkeit, 1780, pp. 497−514.
Précis d'un noveau système musical,
1781.
Essai propre à diriger le goût de ceux qui ne sont pas musiciens,
Paris, 1782.
'Schreiben des H. Abt Vogler, über die Art, wie er die blinde Madem. Paradies das Tonsetzen gelehrt hat', in: Journal aller Journale, no. 4, 1786, pp. 158−170.
'Ästhetisch-kritische Zergliederung des wesentlich vierstimmigen Singsatzes des vom H. Musikdirektor Knecht in Musik gesetzten ersten Psalms', in: Musikalische Korrespondenz der Teutschen Filarmonischen Gesellschaft, 1792, pp. 155−159, 163−164, 314−319, 356−359.
'Bemerkungen über die der Musik vortheilhafteste Bauart eines Musikchors: ein Auszug aus einem Brief des Abt Voglers von Bergen in Norwegen 1792', in: Journal von und für Deutschland, no. 9, 1792, pp. 178−181.
Verbesserung der Forkel'schen Veränderungen über das englische Volkslied 'God Save the King',
Frankfurt, 1793.
Erste musikalische Preisaustheilung für das Jahr 1791,
Frankfurt, 1794.
Inledning til harmoniens kännedom,
Stockholm, 1794.
Clavér-schola med 44 graverade tabeller,
Stockholm, 1798.
Organist-schola,
Stockholm, 1798.
Systême de simplification pour les orgues par l'abbé Vogler
, manuskript, 1798.
Organist-scholans andra del,
Stockholm, 1799.
Aboten Voglers Lection til choral-eleven M.H.,
Stockholm, 1799.
'Aeusserung über Hrn. Knechts Harmonik', in: Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung, no. 2, 1799−1800, pp. 689−696.
Aboten Voglers Andra lection til choral-eleven M.H., S
tockholm, 1800.
Abbed Vogler's Musik-skole,
Copenhagen, 1800.
Abt Vogler's Choral-System,
Copenhagen, 1800.
Data zur Akustik,
Leipzig, 1801; also in: Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung, no. 3, 1800−01, s. 517−525, 533−540, 549−554, 565−571.
Handbuch zur Harmonielehre und für den Generalbass,
Prague, 1802.
Zwei und dreisig Präludien für die Orgel und für das Fortepiano, nebst einer Zergliederung,
Munich, 1806.
Uiber die harmonische Akustik (Tonlehre) und über ihren Einfluss auf alle musikalische Bildungs-Anstalten,
Munich, 1806.
Abbe Voglers gründliche Anleitung zum Clavierstimmen, für die, welche gutes Gehör haben, nebst einer neuen Anzeige, jedes Saiteninstrument vortheilhaft und richtig zu beziehen,
Stuttgart, 1807.
Utile dulci, Vogler's belehrende musikalische Herausgaben: Zergliederung der musikalischen Bearbeitung des Busspsalmen im Choral-Styl,
Munich, 1807.
Harmonisch-akustische Bemerkungen über den Theater-Bau,
Manuscript, ca. 1807.
Utile dulci, A. Voglers belehrende musikalische Herausgaben ... enthaltend a) Beantwortung der Frage: Hat die Musik seit 30 Jahren verloren oder gewonnen? b) Aesthetische Zergliederung der voglerischen teutschen Messe,
Munich, 1808.
'Abt Voglers Vertheidigung seines Simplifications-Systems fur den Orgelbau', in: Neue fränkische Chronik, no. 3, 1808, pp. 775−780.
Vorrede zu Abt Vogler's 'Heilig',
1809.
Die Scala oder personifizierte Stimmbildungs- und Singkunst,
1810.
'Über die Oxydazion der schwingenden Metallkörper', in: Allgemeine Anzeiger der Deutschen, no. 1, 1810, pp. 897−902.
'Ueber Sprach- und Gesang-Automaten, ein akustischer Versuch', in: Sammlung einiger im Frankfurter Museo vorgetragenen Arbeiten, Frankfurt, 1810, pp. 118−130.
System für den Fugenbau, als Einleitung zur harmonischen Gesang-Verbindungs-Lehre,
Offenbach, 1817.

Bibliography

Balz, Hans Martin: ‘Die Orgel als Orchester: Zum 250. Geburtstag von Georg Joseph Vogler’, Ars organin: Internationale Zeitschrift für das Orgelwesen, no. 47, 1999, pp. 194−204.
Betzwieser, Thomas: ‘Chronologie eines exemplarischen Scheiterns: Voglers Opern für Paris’, in: Thomas Betzwieser and Silke Leopold (eds), Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 271−292.
−−−: ‘Langage et poétique dans les analyses d'opéras de l'Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler’, in: Le parole della musica. IIN: Studi sul lessico della letteratura critica del teatro musicale in onore di Gianfranco Folena, Firenze: Olschki, 1995, pp. 69−83.
−−−: ‘Singspiel in Mannheim: Der Kaufmann von Smyrna von Abbé Vogler’, in: Ludwig Finscher et al. (eds), Mozart und Mannheim, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1994, pp. 119−144.
Beyer, Richard: ‘Georg Joseph Vogler und seine Rezeption der vierstimmigen Choralgesänge von Johann Sebastian Bach’, Mitteilungen der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für mittelrheinische Musikgeschichte, no. 76/77, 2003, pp. 359−386.
Biba, Otto: ‘Abbé Georg Joseph Voglers Konzertreisen nach Wien und Linz’, Organa Austriaca, no. 3, 1982, pp. 1−16.
Brenet, Michel: ‘L’Abbé Vogler à Paris en 1781−83’, Archives historiques, artistiques et littéraires, vol. 2, Paris: 1891, pp. 150−156.
Britton, David James: Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler: his Life and his Theories on Organ Design, diss., Eastman School of Music, 1973.
Büttner, Fred: ‘Abbé Voglers “Coro de' Mostri” aus Castore e Polluce (1787) und die Bedeutung der Unterwelt in Opern des 18. Jahrhunderts’, Archiv für Musikwissenschaft, no. 57, 2000, pp. 222−239.
−−−: ‘Zum gattungsgeschichtlichen Kontext des “Coro de' Mostri” aus Georg Joseph Voglers Castore e Polluce von 1787’, in: Theodor Göllner & Stephan Hörner (eds) Mozarts Idomeneo und die Musik in München zur Zeit Karl Theodors, München: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2001, pp. 177−184.
Clausen, Bernd: ‘Warum reisen unsere musikalischen Gesetzgeber nicht in fremde Länder? Das Voglersche Choral-System und sein biografisches Umfeld’, in: Bernd Clausen & Robert Lang (eds) G. J. Voglers Choral-System, Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 2004, pp. 31−58.
Corneilson, Paul E.: ‘Vogler’s method of singing’, The journal of musicology, no. 16, 1998, pp. 91−109.
−−−: Vogler, Georg Joseph [Abbé Vogler], in: Stanley Sadie (ed.) The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, vol. 4, London: Macmillan, 1992, pp. 1036−1037.
Dillmar, Anders: ‘Dödshugget mot vår nationella tonkonst’: Haeffnertidens koralreform i historisk, etnohymnologisk och musikteologisk belysning, diss. in musicology, Lund University, 2001, pp. 164−178.
Edler, Arnfried: ‘Reisende Organisten im späten 18. und in der ersten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts’, in: Christian Meyer (ed.) Le musicien et ses voyages: Pratiques, réseaux et représentations, Berlin: Berliner Wissenschafts-Verlag, 2003, pp. 75−89.
Elovson, Harald: ‘Bengt Lidner och abbé Vogler’, in: Bidrag till nordisk filologi, Lund: Gleerups förlag, 1936, pp. 258−271.
Eppstein, Hans: ‘Instrumentalmusik’, in: Leif Jonsson & Anna Ivarsdotter-Johnson (eds), Musiken i Sverige II, Stockholm: T. Fischer & Musikaliska akademien, 1993, pp. 385−387, 395−396.
Fend, Michael: ‘Voglers Denkwege zwischen Arithmetik und Armenien, Katechismus und Preisrätseln’, in: Thomas Betzwieser and Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 183−199.
Fischer, Georg-Helmut: ‘Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler: a “Baroque” Musical Genius’, in: Bertil H. Van Boer (ed.) Gustav III and the Swedish Stage, Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 1993, pp. 75−102.
−−−: ‘Georg Joseph Vogler, kallad “Abbé”: Ett “barockt” unikum med birett, − ett musikgenis levnadsöde i Sverige och i Europa’, manuscript, 1987.
−−−: ‘Ein “barockes” Musikgenie’, Musik in Bayern: Halbjahresschrift der Gesellschaft für Bayerische Musikgeschichte, no. 52, 1996, pp. 25−54.
−−−: ‘Ein barockes Unikum mit Birett: Geschichte und Geschicke des musikalischen Genies Abbé Vogler’, Deutsches Ärzteblatt − Ärztliche Mitteilungen, no. 82, 1985, pp. 3712−3715.
Friedrich, Felix & Vitus Frosch: ‘Die Vogler-Orgel in der Stadtkirche St. Marien zu Schildau’, in: Felix Friedrich och Vitus Frosch, Orgeln in Sachsen: Ein Reiseführer, Reinhold, 2012, pp. 42−45.
Fröhlich, Franz Joseph: Biographie des grossen Tonkünstlers Abt Georg Joseph Vogler, Würzburg: F.E. Thein, 1845.
Funk, Vera: ‘Die “Gegenstände” zu Vogler Betrachtungen der Mannheimer Tonschule: Die Notenbeispiele des Lehrwerkes aus musikpädagogischem Blickwinkel’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 151−163.
Grave, Floyd K.: ‘Instrumental music in the Betrachtungen der Mannheimer Tonschule: A reflection of music aesthetics in transition’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 131−149.
−−−: ‘Abbé Vogler’s Revision of Pergolesi’s Stabat mater’, in: Journal of the American Musicological Society, no. 30, 1977, pp. 43−71.
−−−: ‘Abbé Vogler and the Study of Fugue’, Music Theory Spectrum, no. 1, 1979, pp. 43−66.
−−−: ‘Abbé Vogler and the Bach Legacy’, Eighteenth-Century Studies, no. 8, 1979−80, pp. 119−41.
−−−: ‘Abbé Vogler’s Theory of Reduction’, Current Musicology, no. 29, 1980, pp. 41−69.
Grave, Floyd K. & Margaret G. Grave: In Praise of Harmony: the Teachings of Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler, Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1987.
Grave, Margaret: Vogler, Georg Joseph [Abbé Vogler], in: Stanley Sadie & John Tyrrell (eds) The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, London: Macmillan, 2000, [with list of works].
−−−: ‘Vogler, Georg Joseph [Abbé Vogler]’, in: Stanley Sadie (ed.) The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, London: Macmillan, 1980 [with list of works].
Gustafsson, Stellan: ‘Abbé Vogler and Pehr Schiörlin’, Orgelforum, no. 8, 1986.
Göllner, Marie Louise: ‘Abbé Vogler und die Anfänge der musikalischen Analyse‘, in: Theodor Göllner & Stephan Hörner (eds) Mozarts Idomeneo und die Musik in München zur Zeit Karl Theodors, München: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2001, pp. 165−176.
Hamann, Heinz Wolfgang: ‘Abbé Voglers Simplifikationssystem im Urteil der Zeitgenossen’, in: Musik und Kirche, no. 33, 1963, p. 5.
Heartz, Daniel: ‘Abt Vogler on the horn parts in Peter Winter's symphony in D minor (1778): A view from within the Mannheim Orchestra’, Historic Brass Society journal, no. 12, 2000, pp. 89−101.
Heidlberger, Frank: ‘”Ausdruk ist die Seele der Musik”: Georg Joseph Voglers Oper Castor und Pollux im historischen Kontext’, in: Thomas Betzwieser and Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 247−269.
−−−: ‘Unus est Deus, unus est Voglerus: Vogler als Lehrer Giacomo Meyerbeers’, in: Ulrich Konrad (ed.) Musikpflege und 'Musikwissenschaft' in Würzburg um 1800, Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1998, pp. 95−120.
Heidrich, Jürgen: ‘”... nicht einen Funken Genie”: Vogler und die Norddeutschen’, in: Thomas Betzwieser and Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 61−70.
Hedwall, Lennart, Svensk Musikhistoria, Stockholm: Edition Reimers, 1996, pp. 53−54, 60−61, 98.
Hennerberg, Carl Fredrik: ‘Einige Dokumente, den Abt Georg Joseph Vogler betreffend’, in: Report of the Fourth Congress of the International Musical Society, London: Novello and Company, 1912, pp. 134−138.
Henze–Döhring, Sabine: ‘Meyerbeers Unterricht bei Abbé Vogler und seine opernästhetischen Folgen’, in: Thomas Betzwieser and Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 293−302.
Huber, Max: ‘Abbé Vogler: der Phantast auf der Orgel’, Musik und Kirche, no. 40, 1970, pp. 199−203.
Ivarsdotter, Anna: ‘Abbé Vogler and the creation of a national opera in Sweden’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 303−312.
Ivarsdotter-Johnson, Anna: ‘Den gustavianska operan’, in: Leif Jonsson & Anna Ivarsdotter-Johnson (eds) Musiken i Sverige II, Stockholm: T. Fischer & Musikaliska akademien, 1993, pp. 341−343.
Jacob, Friedrich: Die Orgel und das Donnergrollen, Männedorf: Orgelbau Th. Khun, 1976.
Janz, Bernhard: ‘Abbé Vogler und Aloysia Weber–Lange’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 39−47.
Janz, Bernhard: ‘Von Vogler bis Fröhlich: Das Würzburger Julius-Spital als Zentrum der Musikausbildung in der zweiten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts’, in: Ulrich Konrad (ed.) Musikpflege und 'Musikwissenschaft' in Würzburg um 1800, Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1998, pp. 17−28.
Johnson, Anna: ‘The hero and the people: On national symbols in Gustavian opera’, in: Inger Mattsson (ed.) Gustavian opera: An interdisciplinary reader in Swedish opera, dance and theatre 1771−1809, Stockholm: Kungl. Musikaliska akademien, 1991, pp. 173−195.
Jonsson, Leif: ‘Mellan konsert och salong’, in: Leif Jonsson & Anna Ivarsdotter-Johnson (eds) Musiken i Sverige II, Stockholm: T. Fischer & Musikaliska akademien, 1993, pp. 401−402, 430−437, 446−449.
Jung, Hermann: ‘Vogler als Lexikograph: Anmerkungen zu seinen Musikartikeln in der Deutschen Encyclopädie (Frankfurt 1778−1804)’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 49−59.
−−−
: ‘Zwischen Hof und Bürgertum: Organisation und Wirkung einer europäischen Musikkultur in Mannheim’, in: Primoz Kuret (ed.) Ob 300. obletnici ustanovitve Academiae Philarmonicorum Labacensium/At the 300th anniversary of Academia Labacensium, Ljubljana: Festival Ljubljana, 2002.
−−−
: ‘Der Komponist als Genie: Abbé Voglers ’Zergliederungen’ Mannheimer Instrumentalmusik’, in: Christine Heyter-Rauland & Christoph-Hellmut Mahling (eds) Untersuchungen zu Musikbeziehungen zwischen Mannheim, Böhmen und Mähren im späten 18. und frühen 19. Jahrhundert: Symphonie, Kirchenmusik, Melodrama, Mannheim: Schott, 1993.
−−−
: ‘”Der pedantisch geniale Abt Vogler”: Musiktheorie und Werkanalyse in der zweiten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts’, Musiktheorie, no. 3, 1988, pp. 99−115.
Kramer, Ursula: ‘”Die wahre Art, eine Theatermusik zu sezen”? Anmerkungen zu Voglers Hamlet-Komposition im Kontext der zeitgenössischen Schauspielmusik-Tradition’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 201−215.
Kreitz, Helmut
: Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler als Musiktheoretiker, diss., Saarbrücken: Universität des Saarlandes, 1957.
Lang, Robert: ‘Eine neue ungekannte Wissenschaft ... Georg Joseph Voglers Choral-System’, in: Bernd Clausen & Robert Lang (eds) G. J. Voglers Choral-System. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 2004, pp. 1−30.
Leberman, Walter
: ‘Zur Authentizität von Georg Joseph Voglers Geburtsort’, Die Musikforschung, no. 34, 1981, pp. 462−463.
Leopold, Silke: ‘Abbé Vogler und sein Oratorium Die Auferstehung Jesu‘, in: Ludwig Finscher, Bärbel Pelker & Rüdiger Thomsen-Fürst (eds) Mannheim: Ein 'Paradies der Tonkünstler'? Kongreßbericht Mannheim 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2002, pp. 253−262.
−−−: ‘Grönland in Mannheim: Abbé Voglers Polymelos und die Idee der ’nazional-karakteristischen’ Musik’, in: Annette Kreutziger–Herr (ed.) Das Andere. Eine Spurensuche in der Musikgeschichte des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1998, pp. 203−224.
Lenz, Irmgard: ‘Georg Joseph Vogler, zur 150. Wiederkehr seines Todestages’, Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, no. 125, 1964, pp. 434−440.
Ludvová, Jitka: Abbé Vogler a Praha, Hudební věda, no. 19, 1982, pp. 99−121.
McKay, Elizabeth Norman
: ‘The Abbé Vogler, Beethoven and the “Waldstein” Sonata, Beethoven Newsletter, no. 8, 1993, pp. 7−12.
Moberg, Carl-Allan: ‘Från Abbé Vogler till Johan Morén. Ledande idéer i 1800-talets svenska koralverk’, in: Kyrkohistorisk årsskrift, 1935, pp. 217−272.
Mårtensson, Helga: ‘Abbé Vogler som orgelbyggare’, in: Tidskrift för kyrkomusik och svenskt gudstjänstliv, no. 7, 1932, pp. 51−55.
Mörner, C.-G. Stellan: ‘Ett musikbrev 1799 från Genseric Brandel till Bernhard Crusell’, STM, vol. 49, 1967, pp. 167−177.
Nitsche, Peter: ‘Vielfalt und Charakteristik: Abbé Vogler als Lehrer Meyerbeers in der Instrumentation’, in: Sieghart Döhring & Arnold Jacobshagen (eds) Meyerbeer und das europäische Musiktheater, Laaber: Laaber-Verlag, 1998, pp. 183−200.
Norlind, Tobias & Emil Trobäck: Kungl. Hovkapellets historia 1526−1926, Stockholm: Wahlström & Widstrand, 1926, pp. 108−110, 114−115.
Norlind, Tobias: Svensk musikhistoria, 2. ed., Stockholm: Wahlström & Widstrand, 1918, pp. 173−175, 205−206, 209, 213−214.
Pasqué, Ernst: Abt Vogler als Tonkünstler, Lehrer und Priester, seine Widersacher und seine Anhänger, Darmstadt: Verlag der Neuen Hespp. Volksblätter, 1884.
Polth, Michael: ‘Die Sinfonien Abbé Voglers und die Mannheimer Sinfonie-Tradition’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 93−130.
Rathey, Markus: ‘Abbé Voglers ’Organist-Schola’ und seine Konzeption der Choralbegleitung jenseits extrovertierter Virtuosität‘, in: Ekkehard Ochs, Walter Werbeck & Lutz Winkler (eds) Das geistliche Lied im Ostseeraum, Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2004, pp. 87−105
−−−: ‘Bach und Vogler: Überlegungen zu einem schwierigen Verhältnis und zur musikalischen Mythenbildung’, in: Mitteilungen der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für mittelrheinische Musikgeschichte, no. 78, 2004, pp. 55−64.
Reckziegel, Walter: ‘Vogler, Georg Joseph, genannt Abbé’, in: Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenward, vol. 13, Kassel: Bärenreiter, 1966, pp. 1894−1905 [with list of works].
Rupp, Émile: Abbé Vogler als Mensch, Musiker und Orgelbautheoretiker unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des sog. ’Simplificationssystems’, Ludwigsburg: Ungeheuer & Ulmer, 1922.
Sanner, Lars Erik: ‘Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler som musikteoretiker’, STM, vol. 32, 1950, 73−102.
Schafhäutl, Karl Emil von: Abt Georg Joseph Vogler, Augsburg: Huttler, 1888 [with list of works].
Schopenhauer, Johanna: ‘Erlebnisse mit Georg Joseph Vogler’, in: Ars organin: Internationale Zeitschrift für das Orgelwesen, no. 55, 2007, pp. 107−108.
Schubart, Christian Friedrich David: Ideen zu einer Ästhetik der Tonkunst, Wien: J.V. Degen, 1806.
Schuler, Manfred: ‘Vogler und seine Deutsche Kirchenmusik’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 71−81.
Schwab, Heinrich W.: ‘”Gegen niemand ist noch so viel geschrieben worden, als gegen Vogler”: Zum Auftreten von Georg Joseph Vogler im dänischen Gesamtstaat’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 313−340.
Schwantag, Sibylle: ‘Abbé Vogler und sein Wirken aus europäischer Sicht: Jahrestagung der Internationalen Association for Organ Documentation’, Die Musikforschung, no. 56, 2003, pp. 408.
Schwarz–Danuser, Monica: ‘Lieto fine und Pantomime: Abbé Voglers Melodram Lampedo im gattungsgeschichtlichen Zusammenhang’, in: Günter Schnitzler & Edelgard Spaude (eds) Intermedialität: Studien zur Wechselwirkung zwischen den Künsten, Freiburg: Rombach Druck- und Verlagshaus, 2004, pp. 249−272.
−−−: ‘”Lieto fine” und Pantomime: Abbé Voglers Melodram Lampedo im gattungsgeschichtlichen Zusammenhang’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 227−246.
Schweiger, Hertha: ‘Abt Vogler’, The Musical Quarterly, no. 25, 1939, pp. 156−166.
−−−: Abbé G.J. Vogler's Orgellehre; ein Beitrag zur Klanggeschichte der frühromantischen Orgel, Wien: J. Kmoch, 1938.
−−−: ‘Abbé Voglers Simplifikationssystem und seine akustischen Studien’, in: Kirchenmusikalisches Jahrbuch, vol. 29, 1934, pp. 72−123.
Silverstolpe, Fredrik Samuel: Några återblickar på rygtets snillets och konsternas verld, Stockholm: Norstedt, 1841, pp. 37−40.
Simon, James: Abt Voglers kompositorisches Wirken mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der romantischen Momente, Berlin: G. Schade, 1904.
Spies, Hermann: Abbé Vogler und die von ihm 1805 simplifizierte Orgel von St. Peter in Salzburg, Mainz: P. Smets, 1932.
Stevens, Jane R.: ‘Georg Joseph Vogler and the “Second Theme” in Sonata Form: Some 18th-Century Perceptions of Musical Contrast’, Journal of Musicology, no. 2, 1983, pp. 278−304.
Sulzmann, Bernd
: ‘Eine Planung Abbé G.J. Voglers aus dem Jahre 1806’, Acta organologica, no. 11, 1977, pp. 54−69.
Swanson, Alan: ‘Kellgren the librettist’, Tijdschrift voor Skandinavistiek, no. 14, 1993, pp. 35−52.
Tegen, Martin: ‘Vogler’, in: Martin Tegen (ed.) Svensk musikhistoria, Stockholm: Samhällsvetarförlaget, 1972, pp. 120−123.
Thomasson, Mårten: ‘Ädla skuggor, vördade fäder − Propagandans användning i två svenska, nationella operor 1771–1792’, 60 credit thesis in musicology, Stockholm University, 1995.
Thomsen-Fürst, Rüdiger: ‘Vogler, Georg Joseph, gen. Abt oder Abbé’, in: Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenward, Personenteil, vol. 17, Kassel & Stuttgart: Bärenreiter Metzler 2007, pp. 175−183 [with list of works].
Veit, Joachim: ‘Vogler in seinen Briefen und Dokumenten’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 17−37.
−−−: ‘Georg Joseph Voglers Beiträge zur Gattung Schauspielmusik’, in: Dagmar Beck & Frank Ziegler (eds) Carl Maria von Weber und die Schauspielmusik seiner Zeit: Bericht über die Tagung der Carl-Maria-von-Weber-Gesamtausgabe in der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin—Preußischer Kulturbesitz am 26. und 27. November 1998, Mainz: Schott, 2003, pp. 75−102.
−−−: ‘Zu den Münchener Fassungen des Castore e Polluce von Vogler’, in: Theodor Göllner & Stephan Hörner (eds) Mozarts Idomeneo und die Musik in München zur Zeit Karl Theodors, München: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2001, pp. 185−208.
−−−: ‘”Es ist ganz göttliche Musik”: Zu Georg Joseph Voglers großer heroischer Oper Samori’, in: Ulrich Konrad (ed.) Musikpflege und ‘Musikwissenschaft’ in Würzburg um 1800, Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1998, pp. 49−69.
−−−: ‘Versuch einer vereinfachten Darstellung des Voglerschen “Harmonie-Systems”’, in: Musiktheorie, no. 6, 1991, pp. 129−149.
−−−: Der junge Carl Maria von Weber: Untersuchungen zum Einfluss Franz Danzis und Abbé Georg Joseph Voglers, Mainz: Schott Musik International, 1990.
−−−: ‘Voglers Beitrag zur Gattung Melodram vor dem Hintergrund der frühen Mannheimer Melodramaufführungen’, in: Christine Heyter-Rauland & Christoph-Hellmut Mahling (eds)  Untersuchungen zu Musikbeziehungen zwischen Mannheim, Böhmen und Mähren im späten 18. und frühen 19. Jahrhundert, Mannheim: Schott, 1987, pp. 212−232.
−−−: ‘Abt Voglers “Verbesserungen” Bachscher Choräle’, in: Dietrich Berke (ed.) Alte Musik als ästhetische Gegenwart: Bach, Händel, Schütz, Kassel: Bärenreiter, 1987, pp. 500−512.
−−−: ‘Gottfried Webers Theorie der Tonsetzkunst und Voglers Harmonie-System’, in: Christine Heyter-Rauland (ed.) Studien zu Gottfried Webers Wirken und zu seiner Musikanschauung, Mainz: Schott, 1993, pp. 69−84.
Verzeichniss der von dem als Theoretiker und Compositeur in der Tonkunst berühmten G.J. Vogler nachgelassenen, grösstentheils noch nicht bekannten praktischen und theoretischen, im Manuscript vorhandenen Werke, Darmstadt, 1814.
Vretblad, Patrik: ‘Abbé Vogler som programmusiker’, in: STM, vol. 9, 1927, pp. 79−98.
−−−: Konsertlivet i Stockholm under 1700-talet, Stockholm: Norstedt, 1918, pp. 78−130.
−−−: Abbé Georg Joseph Vogler i Stockholm: Bidrag till kännedomen om en tysk musikers insats i svenskt musikliv, manuscript, 1949.
Vretblad, Åke & Folke Bohlin: ‘Vogler, Georg Joseph’, in: Sohlmans Musiklexikon, vol. 5, Stockholm: Sohlman, 1979, pp. 841−842.
Wagner, Christina: Abbé Vogler in Darmstadt: Letzte Station auf der Lebensreise eines Geistlichen, eines Musikers, eines Lehrers und Forschers, Darmstadt: Hessisches Staatsarchiv, 1999.
Wiener, Oliver: ‘”Anschauende Erkenntnis” und “natürliches Ohr”: Zum Begriff “System” in den Schriften Georg Joseph Voglers’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 165−182.
−−−: ‘Eine Spielart der ars combinatoria: Zu Georg Joseph Voglers Musiktheorie’, in: Ulrich Konrad (ed.) Musikpflege und ‘Musikwissenschaft’ in Würzburg um 1800, Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1998, pp. 71−94.
Wistedt, Sven: ‘Ett bidrag till en Vogler-biografi’, in: STM, no. 15, 1933, pp. 5−28.
−−−: ‘Abbé Vogler och svensk orgelbyggnadskonst jämte några nyupptäckta Vogler-dokument’, in: STM, no. 14, 1932, pp. 28−58.
Woitas, Monica: ‘Abbé Vogler und die Innovationen der Ballettreform: Randnotizen zum musikästhetischen Diskurs des späten 18. Jahrhunderts’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg 1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 217−226.
Wolf, Ludwig: ‘Zum 175. Todestag Georg Joseph Voglers (1749−1814)’, in: Musik in Bayern: Halbjahresschrift der Gesellschaft für Bayerische Musikgeschichte e.V., no. 39, 1989, pp. 83−96.
Würtz, Roland: Verzeichnis und Ikonographie der Kurpfälzischen Hofmusiker zu Mannheim nebst darstellendem Theaterpersonal, 1723−1803, Wilhelmshaven: Heinrichshofen, 1975.
Zywietz, Michael: ‘”...magische Mischung der Register”: Voglers Orgelbau-Konzeption zwischen Tradition und Innovation’, in: Thomas Betzwieser & Silke Leopold (eds) Abbé Vogler: Ein Mannheimer im europäischen Kontext: Internationales Colloquium Heidelberg1999, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2003, pp. 83−92.
Öijen, Arne: ‘Fragment ur Josef Voglers liv och gärning’, in: Musikern, no. 12, 1966, pp. 6.

Summary list of works

19 operas (Castore e Polluce, Gustaf Adolph och Ebba Brahe, Samori etc.), 3 melodramas, 4 ballets, music to 8 plays (Hermann von Unna, etc.), orchestral music (3 symphonies, several piano concertos and others), chamber music, works for organ, works for piano (Polymelos, etc.), works for voice and orchestra, works for choir and orchestra (Helig är Herren, Musik till Serafimerordensdagen den 28 april 1795, etc.), works for choir (Hosianna, Davids son, etc.).

Collected works

Operas and comic operas
Der Kaufmann von Smyrna (C.F. Schwan, after N. Chamfort), 1771, rev. 1778.
Erwin und Elmire (J.W. von Goethe), 1781.
Albert der Dritte von Bayern (K.T. von Traitteur), 1781.
Glicères, 1781.
Atianax, 1781.
Dardanus, 1781.
Eglé, 1781.
Ariadne auf Naxos, 1781.
La kermesse, ou La foire flamande (J. Patrat), 1783.
Le patriotisme/Les Paysans patriotes (N.M. de Morvilliers), 1784.
Castore e Polluce (C.I. Frugoni), 1787; trans. to German: Castor und Pollux, 1806.
Gustaf Adolph och Ebba Brahe (J.H. Kellgren after Gustav III), 1788.
Der Koppengeist auf Reisen, oder Rübezahl (A. von Kotzebue), 1802.
Samori (F.X. Huber), 1804, rev. 1811.
Epimenides, 1806.
Der Admiral/Der gewonnene Prozess, 1810/11.

Melodramas
Lampedo (C.F. Lichtenberg), 1779.
Zoroastre, 1796.
Tuiskon ist erwacht, 1814.

Ballets
Die heilsame Furcht oder Schuster-Ballet, 1768, rev. 1807.
La Forêt enchantée/La soirée enchantée, 1771.
Le rendez-vous de chasse, ou Les vendanges interrompues par les chasseurs/Jäger-Ballett, 1772/1777.
Le forgeron villageois/Schmied-Ballett, 1777.

Incidental music
Hamlet (W. Shakespeare), 1778.
Der Eremit auf Formentera/Eremiten (A. von Kotzebue), 1785.
Athalie (J. Racine), 1786.
Hermann von Unna (A.F. Skjöldebrand), 1795.
Die Kreutzfahrer (A. von Kotzebue), 1802.
Die Hussiten vor Naumburg (A. von Kotzebue), 1802.
Die Spanier in Peru, oder Rollas Tod (A. von Kotzebue), 1803.
Sullas Tod, ?

Symphonies (sinfonias)
Sinfonia in G major, 1779.
Sinfonia in D minor, 'Paris', 1782.
Sinfonia in C major, 'Satisfactions Sinfonie', 'La scala', 1799, rev. 1806 as 'Bayerische National-Sinfonie'.
(4 concert sinfonias, not preserved).

Concertos
Klavierkonzert B-flat major, 1770.
6 leichte Clavierconcerte (C, B, a, D, G, F), 1778.
Concerto C major for harpsichord/clavier, 1782.
Variations on Air de Marlborough, 1791.

Masses
Missa pasatorita, D.
Missa pastorella, A, 1768, 1767.
Missa pastoritia, E, 1775, rev. 1804.

Music for clavier
112 Petits Preludes pour l’orgue, 1782.
16 Variations pour le clavecin C major over ’Ah, vous dirai-je Maman’, 1785.
Sonate à quatre mains pour le Piano-Forte F major, 1785.
Thema mit Variation C major, printed in Musikaliskt Tidsfördrif 1, 1789.
Variation över God Save the King C major, 1791.
Six Sonates (D, C, B, G, F, E) for 2 clavier, 1794.
Pièces de clavecin, Stockholm, 1798.

Vocal music
Cantata Helig är Herran (B. Lidner), 1786.
Allegori: Svenskt festspel till förhärligande af Konung Gustaf III, 1786.
Divertissement, då konungen lade hörnstenen vid Brahelund, den 19 augusti 1786 (J. G. Oxenstierna), 1786.
Musik till Serafimerordensdagen den 28 april 1795, for Soli, choir and orchestra (A. N. Edelcrantz), 1795.
Prolog för kröningen av Gustavus IV, 1795.

Compositions with a relation to Sweden
Svenskt festspel till förhärligande af Konung Gustaf III, 1786.
Sångstycke för den 19 augusti 1786, 1786.
Gustaf Adolph och Ebba Brahe, 1786.
Musik till Athalie (J. Racine), 1786.
Cantata Helig är Herran (B. Lidner), 1786.
Prolog till Glucks Armide, 1787.
Grönländsk romans, piano, 1791.
Variations de l’Air de Marlborough, piano och orkester, 1791.
Sång från Magnificat Fecit potentiam, 1791.
Musik för Serafimerorden i Sverige, 1791.
Sjöslaget vid Svensksund, orgel, 1791.
Kosackdans från Serafimermusiken, 1795.
Svensk dans, piano, 1795.
Marche de Charles XII auprès de Narva, 1795.
Der eheliche Zwist, pianokvartett, 1795.
Venetiansk gondoljärsång, piano, 1795.
Prolog för kröningen av Gustavus IV, 1795.
Hosianna Davids son, ca 1795.
Te Deum / O Gud! vi lofve Dig, 1797.
Missa Pastoritia, 1797.
Musik till Hermann von Unna (Skjöldebrand), 1798.
15 pièces de clavecin faciles, 1800.